December 9, 2012

Selects taken by Photos Editors Graham Beck and Alex Gaynor from today’s BC women’s basketball game against Arizona State today.

December 8, 2012

Selects by Photo Editor Graham Beck from BC basketball’s win over St. Francis today.

December 6, 2012

Inside The Issue: December 6th.

1. Addazio Introduced As Head Football Coach - By Austin Tedesco, Asst. Sports Editor

2. Living Like An Eagle: York Still Hasn’t Changed, Even With The Ultimate Record In Sight – By Greg Joyce, Sports Editor

3. Alumni Call For The Return Of Varsity Lacrosse – By Rosemary Chandler, Adam Parshall, Katharine Rooney, and Austin Tedesco, For The Heights

4. Column: Bates Has His Man In Addazio – By Austin Tedesco, Asst. Sports Editor

5. Players Energized By Addazio’s Enthusiasm – By Greg Joyce, Sports Editor

6.Men’s Basketball: Harvard Takes Fifth Straight – By Austin Tedesco, Asst. Sports Editor

7. Column: After 924 Wins, York Personifies ‘Ever To Excel’ On And Off The Ice – By Chris Grimaldi, Heights Editor

8. Women’s Hockey Heads Into The Holidays On A High Note At UNH – By Emily Malcynsky, Heights Staff

9. Men’s Basketball: Inability To Stop Runs Hurts Eagles – By Matty Pierce, Heights Staff


From The News Section: Athletes Walk Thin Line When On The Internet – By Austin Tedesco, Asst. Sports Editor


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(Graham Beck/Photo Editor)

By Austin Tedesco, Asst. Sports Editor

When head coach Steve Donahue sees his team shoot almost 60 percent from the field, he expects them to win. Despite the apparent offensive efficiency on Tuesday night, the Boston College men’s basketball fell to Harvard 79-63 in the program’s fifth straight loss to the Crimson.

“It’s hard to imagine you shoot 58 percent and lose by 16 pretty handedly,” Donahue said. “There’s a mental toughness side on both sides of the ball that they had and we didn’t. That was, I’m sure, apparent to everybody. In particular, when they pressured us – even though we were scoring we were never understanding and staying poised and confident in our offense. But when we pressured them they just moved like clockwork to the next thing. And like I said it’s kind of mind-boggling to put up those kinds of numbers and lose pretty handedly.”

Ryan Anderson opened the game by scoring 11 of the Eagles first 13 points and it looked as though the Crimson didn’t have an answer for the BC forward, but after the first five minutes his offense began to fade.

“Part of our offense is everyone moves and everyone touches the ball,” said freshman guard Joe Rahon. “Looking back we probably should’ve tried to make more of an effort on the court to try to get it to him when he was hot, but they did do a good job of keying on him. When we were driving they were shading him a little bit more than they did at the start of the game, but looking back we probably should’ve tried to ride him a little more there.”

BC kept the game in reach until the second half, when Harvard went on a run that the Eagles couldn’t match.

“The Achilles’ heel for us is that we allow a play that just happened to snowball to the next play, and it happens in all facets of basketball,” Donahue said. “It’s something that I can’t tell you how many times we talk about it, we harp on it, and we show it to them on film.”

The Harvard players methodically attacked the BC defense on their way to tying their highest point total of the season so far. They made BC defend for the whole shot-clock before finally finding a clean look that consistently fell through the net.

“That’s the two hardest things to do in basketball,” Donahue said. “Is to push it early on and stop them, and then to have the poise and toughness and confidence at the end of the shot clock, and they exploited both ends of that.”

On the offensive end, BC was flustered by the Harvard pressure which broke the rhythm of the motion offense.

“They did a great job of pressuring us and trying to deny easy swing passes,” Rahon said. “I think we didn’t handle it as well as we needed to. We knew they were going to do it. We knew it was coming and we were trying to just get backdoor cuts, get sharp cuts, and move the ball, but they did a good job of taking us out of our rhythm there for a little bit, and we were never really able to turn it around and get over the hump.”

Donahue wouldn’t chalk up the loss to experience, though.

“Can’t say experience anymore,” Donahue said. “I’m done with that. The defense was poor. It’s got to get better. We’ll work at it, but the defense was really poor.”

Although many of the Eagles looked out of sync and worn down during the second half, Donahue said it wasn’t an issue with effort.

“It’s not effort,” Donahue said. “It isn’t. We have to, my staff and myself, get them playing at a certain high level, consistently, all the time, and not missing a beat. It appears at time that it’s effort, but I just think it’s the mental toughness part of it that the guys don’t have the ability to fight through. These guys will continue to get better at it, we’ll continue to bring people into this program that understand it, and we’ll build a culture similar to what we did at Cornell and similar to what Harvard has – but to say they’re not trying? No, they try. They try really hard.”

His players need to be more mentally tough, and he says that will come through failures like this as he continues to build the program.

“I love these guys, as I say all the time,” Donahue said. “I have great confidence that they’ll get it and we’re going to work extremely hard to do it. Unfortunately, and I know I sound like a broken record, but we’re going to have failures here. We’re going to have some extreme frustration, but that to me is the only way you can be successful.”

December 5, 2012

Shots by Photo Editor Graham Beck from BC men’s basketball’s loss to Harvard tonight.

By Greg Joyce, Sports Editor

Steve Addazio will be the next head coach of the Boston College football team, athletic director Brad Bates announced today. Addazio will leave his job as head coach at Temple University to take over for Frank Spaziani, who was fired just nine days ago.

 “I’ve only been here six weeks,” Bates said. “I’m looking for a partner who I can be joined at the hip with and really strive for excellence in Boston College athletics. [Addazio] is a key leader in this department.”

 Bates interviewed Addazio on two separate occasions before making the hire official today. Addazio will be signed to a six-year contract, though the money was not disclosed.

 “The process, as I’ve said all along – I wasn’t really strictly adhering to a timeline,” Bates told The Heights, just after he met with the team to announce the hire. “We had to make sure we got a perfect fit. The process was meticulous and deliberate enough that there’s no question in my mind we were able to accomplish that.”

 Bates met with the media on Tuesday night to further discuss the hiring.

 “I really believe that Steve Addazio is a great coach who is a great fit for Boston College right now,” Bates said.

 Since he met with the players nine days ago and talked about what they wanted in a new head coach, Bates knew that he needed to hire a coach the players could build a strong relationship with.

 “Everything in Steve’s background demonstrates that he’s going to create a family culture in the program that’s a team,” Bates said.

 Secondly, the team wanted a coach who brought great passion to the locker room and the field, and Bates said he found exactly that in Addazio.

 “You’ll see [Addazio] has incredible passion and energy,” Bates said. “He is one of the most energized, passionate people I’ve ever been around. His enthusiasm is contagious. Just sitting around him, you’re going to feel more inspired. So imagine that playing out in a coaching methodology.”

 The third factor the team wanted in a coach was someone who was going to win, and Bates said that Addazio “certainly has a background in competitive success and winning.”

 During the search process, Bates talked to NFL owners, NFL coaches, commissioners, college head coaches and assistant coaches, executive directors, and more. He reached out to those people he trusted in order to figure out if certain candidates would be a good fit at BC.

 At the end of the 2012 season, multiple BC football players came out and said there was a lack of accountability on the team. While the players said the responsibility falls on them to change that, Bates believes that Addazio can help improve that attitude as well.

 “He’s got a plan, he’ll be a disciplinarian,” Bates said. “He will be incredibly demanding on and off the field, but at the end of the day, the students are going to know he genuinely and sincerely cares about them.”

 Bates told the players in a team meeting at 5 p.m. today, and wanted them to hear the announcement from him first.

 “We wanted to make sure the players heard it from us,” Bates said. “We try to do everything we can to make sure they’re not hearing it secondhand. We tried to be as stealth as possible so that they’d hear it from us.”

 Though he didn’t want to put words in their mouth, Bates said the players’ reactions “seemed to be a general level of excitement and enthusiasm.”

 While the coaching carousel in college football is ongoing and unpredictable, Bates made it seem like he didn’t think Addazio would use BC as a stepping stone in his career.

 “This is a guy who grew up in the Northeast and has dreamed of being at Boston College,” Bates said. “He is thrilled to be here and he’s already hitting the ground running. We bounced over a lot of things today in terms of what needs to be prepared and what he’s already getting into.

 “Who can predict the future? Is any place a destination anymore? The landscape of college athletics is evolving  so quickly, and there’s so many different variables that are involved in how people choose jobs and their longevity. I can’t predict the future completely. But here’s a guy who’s incredibly enthusiastic to be at Boston College.”

 Bates said he was looking for a coach who would provide some stability in a program that has had a lot of attrition in recent history.

 “Continuity is an incredible cohesive force in building a team,” Bates said. “And so having attrition is disruptive. This team has had a lot of disruption in terms of that continuity.”

 Bates said that Addazio has been on his list of potential coaching candidates “for a number of years.”

 Addazio compiled a record of 13-11 at Temple in his two years there—9-4 in 2011 (as a member of the MAC) and 4-7 in 2012 (as a member of the Big East). Prior to that, Addazio was the offensive coordinator at Florida in 2009 and 2010, and an assistant at various spots from 2005-2008. While at Florida, Addazio was part of a staff that won the BCS national championship in 2006 and 2008. He served as a mentor for the Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Tim Tebow during that time.

 Bates first got to know Addazio when he was at Florida, and has been watching and studying him since then. He also got to see Addazio firsthand when Temple faced Miami in a game during the 2011 season.

 “I saw him firsthand two years ago because I was at Miami University and Temple was still in the MAC,” Bates said. “I had actually gotten to know him a few years ago when he was at Florida, and I have been really watching him since his work at Florida and [I have] been studying him. So that’s why he was on my shortlist to begin with.”

 Former BC assistant coach Ryan Day worked under Addazio at Temple this year, and Bates said that while he didn’t talk to Day directly, he did get Day’s take secondhand.

 “I talked to a lot of people, but not directly,” he said. “I didn’t want to do things … there are two ways of approaching it. You can have trusted colleagues make calls so there’s no direct communication, but people that you know and trust, you can call directly. I don’t know Ryan personally, so there was communication that was taking place, but it was secondhand.”

Regarding the current BC coaching staff, Bates said it is something that has yet to be decided in terms of who will stay and who will go.

 “All of that’s undecided,” he said. “We’ve certainly had conversations, but nothing that would be definitive at this point. We’ve talked in general terms. He clearly has some ideas of what he wants to do, but he’s going to research the context. He’s going to visit with the team, he’s going to visit with the staff.

 “This is a well-connected guy in the football community. He’s going to have an amazing collection of coaches that he can assemble. The key is going to be making sure that he gets a group that has diverse skill sets and experiences so that they compliment one another.”

 Speculation had surfaced this morning from outlets including ESPN that the three finalists were Notre Dame defensive coordinator Bob Diaco, Ball State head coach Pete Lambo, and the New Orleans Saints’ offensive line coach Aaron Kromer. Addazio’s name had not come up as a candidate throughout the process, and in response to the supposed list of finalists, Bates said it was “interesting.”

 “Honestly, I don’t know what the speculation was,” Bates said. “Steve was actually someone on my short list from the beginning. He’s got a tremendous reputation, people speak very highly of him. People that I respect in the industry have enormous regard for his talents and what he’s done in his coaching background.”

 Addazio, 53, will be introduced in an official press conference at 3 p.m. tomorrow in the Yawkey Center at BC. 

December 4, 2012

We’ve talked in general terms. He clearly has some ideas of what he wants to do, but he’s going to research the context. He’s going to visit with the team, he’s going to visit with the staff. This is a well-connected guy in the football community. He’s going to have an amazing collection of coaches that he can assemble. The key is going to be making sure that he gets a group that has diverse skill sets and experiences so that they compliment one another.

Brad Bates, asked about what will happen to the current Boston College football staff with the hiring of Steve Addazio as head coach.

By Greg Joyce, Sports Editor

Boston College will hire a new head football coach in the next 24-48 hours, sources told The Heights Tuesday morning. Athletic director Brad Bates later tweeted that he met with the seniors on the team this morning to “keep them informed about [the] search.”

“Important for team to hear news first when we’re ready for announcement,” Bates wrote in the tweet at 11:56 a.m.

ESPN’s Brett McMurphy is reporting that the three finalists for the job are Notre Dame defensive coordinator Bob Diaco, Ball State head coach Pete Lembo, and the NFL’s New Orleans Saints’ offensive line coach Aaron Kromer.

Bates is currently on campus in Chestnut Hill, and according to Brian Hamilton of the Chicago Tribune, Diaco is in Arkansas for the Broyles Award Luncheon, where he is expected to be honored as the top assistant coach in college football.

 Notre Dame is the No. 1 team in the country, and Diaco’s defense will be playing Alabama in the national championship game on Jan. 7. Lembo’s Ball State went 9-3 this year, and will play in the Beef O’Brady’s Bowl on Dec. 21. Kromer has been an NFL assistant since 2000, and before that was an assistant coach at Miami University in Ohio from 1990-1998.

December 3, 2012

Inside the Issue: December 3, 2012

  1. Closing In On A Class Of His Own: Eagles Bounce Back Against Terriers In Career Night For York, By DJ Adams, Heights Senior staff
  2. Freshman Terrier Goalie Shuts Down BC Offense, By Greg Joyce, Sports Editor
  3. Can The Bowl Drought End In 2013?, By Austin Tedesco, Asst. Sports Editor
  4. Point/Counterpoint; Should Doug Martin Return As OC? Experience And Stability Bring Success, By Felicia Figueiredo, Heights Staff
  5. Point/Counterpoint; Should Doug Martin Return As OC? An Inconsistent Record Raises Doubt, By Connor Mellas, Heights Staff
  6. Shields Pushes BC Past Rutgers, By Chris Grimaldi, Heights Editor

December 2, 2012

Gallery by Heights alum Alex Trautwig from tonight’s 5-2 win over BU as Jerry York tied Ron Mason for the winningest coach in college hockey history.